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Naor Isak

math & physics instructor

I have always been a curious, nerdy kid growing up. Curiosity about the natural world and how everything works has been a fascination for me, and once I learned physics and math in school, it seemed like I unlocked the mysteries of the universe. I have been doing math for fun ever since I was a young boy, even memorizing 100 numbers of pi in 7th grade (and still remember them)! And over the years, I learned that I love to help others see the beauty in the world of numbers.

 

Due to my love of physics and strength in math, it seemed perfect to go study engineering, and boy am I happy I did. I went to Binghamton University in New York (my home state) and got my Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering. I am currently working full time as a Design & Analysis Engineer at Boeing, and have a desire to further my education concurrently in the aerospace field. I am super excited to have worked over a year now at the company, and look forward to many more!

 

Throughout my college career, I’ve also learned how to code, and using these skills, I was able to write many different scripts that helped me solve homework problems, or even do side projects I was interested in. One of my most prominent projects I was involved in was that I helped develop a flight simulator for a rocket project in my university. This simulator is a code we developed from scratch that calculates very big and complicated math in an attempt to do the impossible: send a rocket to space (as college students)! We work alongside other teams of the rocket project to help design the rocket, and we have had many successful flight tests so far. Since I graduated, I am now a mentor for the team, and I cannot be any more proud of what they have achieved today.

 

To bring it all back to Archimedes, I am ecstatic to work with every student in hopes of showing them the endless possibilities that math and physics can bring them, both in their education and in life! I hope to inspire them to push past the struggles of math, and to enjoy the knowledge and power it unlocks about how our world works.